Posts tagged flea

Article Highlight : “The Natural Approach to Flea Control” [continued : killing fleas!]

Yesterday we highlighted some of the great flea information from our Holistic Health Care Library, today we’ll share highlights from the article on how to protect your dog and cat companions.

“The Natural Approach to Flea Control” [continued : killing fleas!]

Stage 1 – Armoring Your Companions

Protection from the Inside Out

Another important fact about fleas is that they prefer weaker, less healthy hosts and very young puppies and kittens with undeveloped immune systems. Knowing this, we can arm our pets for flea resistance by boosting their health and immunity. If you have a flea problem, this is the first place to start.

If you’ve read any of the other articles on our site, you’ve heard this before:  Diet is the foundation of health.  [Read more about flea control]

External Protection

Learn how to use a Flea Comb effectively and repel fleas using neem oil products and shampoo. [Read more about flea control]

Then Move on to killing fleas once they are on your pet!  [Read more about flea control]

Worried about using Spot-On treatments?  You should be!

A pesticide is a pesticide no matter what you call it. We only recommend spot-on flea products as a last resort for animals with severe flea allergies. [Read more about flea control]

Also, remember that all of our flea products are on sale through April 30th, 2010!

Day 1 – About Fleas
Day 2 – Killing Fleas on your pets
Day 3 – Controlling Fleas in your environment
Coming up later this month! – Top 10 Common Myths about Fleas

View our Flea Care Kits for dogs and cats.

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Top 10 Summer Safety Tips for Pets

“The heat is on,” and with it comes a number of special summertime problems for our pets. Common sense and preventive measures can prevent untold illness and injuries for our pets. Here are our Top 10 tips for a safe and happy summer:

1. Prevent Parasites. Fleas, ticks, and other parasites are a year-round problem in some areas, but in the summer they are just about everywhere. Not only are these pests a nuisance to your dog or cat, but they are carriers of disease and other parasites. Mosquitoes, for instance, can transmit heartworms; fleas can give your pet tapeworms; and the list of tick-borne diseases is a long one. Thwarting parasites requires a broad approach and vigilance on your part, with a little help from effective preventives. Many natural products are available; talk to your vet about what’s needed for your area.

2. Stay Cool in Hot Weather. Pets are susceptible to heatstroke, so be sure your pet always has a shelter from the sun, and plenty of fresh water. If it’s extremely hot and humid in your area, consider a cooling vest for your dog.

3. Let Rover Stay Home. It’s been said before but bears repeating—never leave your dog in a car if the weather is warm, and certainly not if it’s hot. Cracking the windows makes no difference in the temperature gain. It doesn’t take high temperatures for it to be dangerous. A car parked in the shade can reach dangerous temperatures on a hot day, and if it’s in the sun, the temperature can rapidly rise up to 160°F. Experiments showed that even at a mild 72°F, the inside of a car reached 116°F in an hour, plenty hot to kill a dog. One dog died after being locked in a parked car on a sunny, 67°F day, even though the car windows were cracked.

Dogs can’t sweat—they control their body temperature by panting. If the air in the car is near or above the dog’s body temperature (about 100°F), the dog will be unable to cool itself, and its body temperature can quickly rise to fatal levels (over 107°F). Heatstroke symptoms in dogs include: heavy panting, salivation, disorientation, agitation, rapid heart beat, lethargy, vomiting, seizures, coma and death.

If you see a dog left alone in a car under dangerous conditions, note the car’s location, color, model, make, and license plate number and contact local humane authorities or police. If you can make a good guess as to which store the driver might be in, ask the store manager to page them. If the animal shows symptoms of heatstroke, take steps to gradually lower its body temperature immediately.
* Move the animal into the shade or an air-conditioned area.
* Apply ice packs or cold towels to the head, neck, and chest; or immerse her in cool (but not cold) water.
* Allow small amounts of cool water or let the dog lick some ice cubes.
* Get to a veterinarian as soon as possible.

4. Avoid Sunburn. Dogs and cats with white faces or ears may be susceptible to sunburn, even if they only “sun-bathe” indoors. Apply a non-toxic sunscreen to vulnerable areas where the fur is thin and you can see skin.

5. Watch What Goes In Your Pet’s Mouth. Poisonous mushrooms grow in many areas of the country. Patrol your property regularly to remove these fungal hazards. Many plants are also toxic. As a special note, this is the time of year when people are using fertilizers and pesticides in yards and on lawns. Don’t let your dog wander in other yards where chemicals might be used.

6. Take Care with Critters. With dogs accompanying their people walking and hiking in summer, there are increased chances of an encounter with unpleasant or even dangerous wildlife, such as skunks, porcupines, rattlesnakes and other reptiles. Certain large toads have poisons on their skin that can be harmful if your pet even licks at the toad. Toads come out in wet weather and when it’s dark, so be especially careful when letting your dog out at these times.

7. Stay Clear of Sharp Objects. As the grasses and other plants die back, their seed cases can present special hazards. Foxtails and burrs can get caught in the paws or fur and work their way into—or even through—the skin. Check your pet after every outing to make sure they’re free of these nasty items. If you live near water or take your dog on fishing trips, be watchful of fishing hooks and lines that you are using, or that may be left behind in shallow water or on the shore.

8. Travel Safely.
As much as your dog may love to ride in the bed of a pickup, or hang his head out the window, allowing either can cause your dog a world of hurt. Dust and gravel in the eyes are the least of it; every year thousands of dogs are injured or killed when they jump or fall from vehicles. Even in an enclosed car, animals can be thrown and injured if you have to brake suddenly. A sturdy harness is the equivalent of a good seatbelt for you!  And of course, if you’re a boater, don’t forget a flotation device for the dog!

9. Carry Identification. Of course, all pets should wear a collar and ID tag year-round. Cats should be outfitted with a breakaway collar for maximum safety. Have your pet microchipped for added “insurance.”

10. Be Prepared. At home or away, carry a first aid kit in case of emergencies. There are special kits for both dogs and cats, so you never have to panic! You might also want to keep flower essences on hand, to keep your pet calm while you give first aid or head for the vet. Several products are available:
Bach Rescue Remedy

SpiritEssence Stress Stopper

Pet Essences Emergency Rescue

Have Fun! Once you’re ready and alert for summer hazards, it’s the best and most fun time of year to get out—or just hang out—with your pet!

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