Posts tagged natural

Stress and the Immune System

We’re all familiar with the fight-or-flight reflex, in which acute stress causes the release of the hormone adrenaline, which triggers that response. However, our pets are more likely to experience chronic stress, which has many effects, especially on the immune system.

Both psychological and physical stress are scientifically proven to have a negative impact on the immune system. Now, looking at our pets sleeping contentedly on the sofa, we might think that they don’t have such stressful lives. But even the most pampered couch potato may be subjected to many physical stressors every day:

  • indoor and outdoor air pollution
  • electromagnetic fields, household chemicals
  • hundreds of other large and small assaults, particularly on their keen senses of hearing and smell
  • vaccination
  • medication
  • synthetic additives in food or treats

Psychological stresses also abound:

  • canine and feline hierarchies and social rules
  • behavioral modifications necessary for living with humans—such as not climbing the drapes, tipping the trashcan, or marking all corners of the territory.

Not all of these apply to every pet, but the bottom line is that if a pet thinks it’s stressed, it is stressed, whether or not we can even perceive the cause. Reducing stress, keeping the immune system healthy, and preventing cellular and DNA damage from free radicals and other toxic compounds, are the keys to disease prevention and overall well-being.

To minimize the effects of physical and environmental stress, opt for non-toxic, pet-friendly household and personal care products. Don’t forget that lotions, perfumes, after-shaves, and even topical medications you use on yourself can rub off on your pets, and be ingested when they groom themselves–or lick you!

Many commercial pet foods, especially dry foods and treats, are often made with poor quality ingredients with multiple synethetic additives and preservatives—which is why Only Natural Pet doesn’t sell most of them! Instead, feed one of our natural pet foods, organic pet foods,  or  raw diets. To support the immune system, as well as to prevent chronic inflammation and the degenerative diseases it causes, supplement with Omega-3 fatty acids and antioxidants.

We can alleviate psychological stress by using flower essences, massage, music, and other stress-relieving methods such as play therapy, exercise, indoor entertainment, and interactive games.

For Dogs:

Interactive Throw Toys

Secure Exercise

Indoor Entertainment

For Cats:

Interactive Toys

Indoor Entertainment

We should also remember that our pets often pick up on and reflect our own stresses. Here’s a unique method to help relieve stress in ourselves and our pets: Pet Healing and Meditation CDs.

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Seizures and Epilepsy in Pets

There are few things more frightening than witnessing your cat or dog having a full-blown seizure—falling down, paddling with its paws, maybe even barking or yowling. Seizures are the result of an abnormal burst of electrical signals from the brain. Possible causes include toxic substances, electrolyte imbalances or abnormalities, head trauma, or metabolic conditions such as diabetes or thyroid disease. The uncoordinated firing of neurons in the brain creates seizures (convulsions). These range from a few moments of mental “absence” where the animal seems not to be aware of its surroundings, to severe “grand mal” with unconsciousness, stiffened limbs or flailing movements, and uncontrolled urination and/or defecation.

Stages of Seizures

The typical seizure has four stages; not all of these may be noticeable in any particular animal:

1. The prodromal phase may precede the seizure by hours or days. It is characterized by changes in mood or behavior.

2. The aura is the start of a seizure. Signals include whining, trembling, salivation, clingy behavior, restlessness, hiding.

3. The “ictus” or actual seizure. Mild seizures may involve “fly-biting” (where the dog will snap its teeth in the air) or lack of awareness. At its worst, the animal will lose consciousness and fall, going into a periods of intense physical activity lasting a few minutes. Multiple separate seizures in a row are called “cluster” seizures. More than 3 seizures in a 24-hour period, or any seizure lasting more than 10 minutes (called “status epilepticus”), are life-threatening conditions; seek emergency veterinary care.

4. The post-ictal period follows the seizure. The animal will regain consciousness, and return to normal over a few minutes or hours; meantime they may appear disoriented, blind, and/and deaf, and eat or drink excessively.

Causes of Seizures

In younger animals, seizures are sometimes caused by abnormal blood supply to the liver (shunt). Infectious causes are also seen more commonly in young animals. Blood tests including titers for tick-borne diseases (for pets who go outside in tick-endemic areas) as well as other infectious causes are advised. Several infectious organisms can be carried in raw meat, so seizures in a young animal on a raw diet should be fully investigated for such diseases.

In cats, infectious causes include Feline Infectious Peritonitis (FIP), Cryptococcus (a common environmental fungus that is especially associated with pigeons), Toxoplasma (a protozoal parasite), feline leukemia, feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV or feline AIDS), meningitis or encephalitis).

In dogs, infectious causes include fungus (Cryptococcus, Asperigillus), parasitic (Toxoplasma, Neospora, Cuterebra), viral (canine distemper, rabies), and bacteria (Rickettsia, Ehrlichia, and other tick-borne diseases). Most often, no cause is found, and the diagnosis is “idiopathic epilepsy,” meaning “epilepsy due to unknown cause.”

In older animals (dogs over 5 years old; over age 10 for cats), tumors become a more common cause, but strokes also occur. A CT scan or MRI may be able to locate the mass; there may be a surgical solution, or radiation may be helpful.

Medical Treatment

In both dogs and cats, the most common treatment for seizures is phenobarbital tablets (given by mouth). It takes about 2 weeks to reach a blood level that will control seizures. At that point, the blood level of the drug should be checked. Phenobarbital can be harmful to the liver. Liver function and drug levels should be rechecked at least every 6 months. Cats are more resistant than dogs to the drug’s side effects, which include sedation and increased hunger and thirst. There are other medications that can be used in dogs; but few of them work well in cats.

Natural Treatments

Natural therapies for seizures in both dogs and cats include:

1. High-protein, very low-carb diet. Homemade meat-based foods, low-carb/grainless canned foods, and frozen raw diets are all good options for seizure patients. In humans, this type of diet is called “ketogenic” and it is quite successful, especially in children. Dogs and cats are built to eat just this type of diet. Carbohydrates, including treats, should be avoided. Note that some parasites of raw meat can cause neurologic problems; it may be best to cook all meat products before feeding.

2. Taurine. This amino acid is crucial for nerve and brain function. It is very safe and cannot be overdosed. Give approximately 125 mg per day per 50 pounds. Products containing a sufficient amount of taurine include:

Pet Naturals of Vermont Natural Cat Daily

Pet Naturals of Vermont Dog Daily Senior

Only Natural Pet Super Daily Canine Senior

3. B-vitamins. Vitamins B3 (niacin) and B6 (pyridoxine) seem to be the most important ones, but a general B-complex could be used. A balanced 50 mg B-complex (often called “B-50”) made for humans will contain enough of both for pets. Because B-vitamins are water soluble, they are generally safe.

4. Boswellia. This herb, usually used for joint pain, has provided good results in studies on some human brain tumors. Give 100-150 mg per day per 10 pounds.

Genesis Resources Canine Pain Plus Formula

Genesis Resources Feline Pain Plus Formula

Only Natural Pet Lubri-Ease

5. Omega-3 fatty acids. Anti-inflammatory Omega-3s are also vital to brain and nervous system function.

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Feline Upper Respiratory Problems

Many cats have chronic problems with upper respiratory congestion (runny or stuffy nose, nasal discharge) and/or conjunctivitis (inflammation of the eye membranes; the eyes may be red, swollen, watery, crusty, or goopy). Nasal or eye symptoms may be both be present, or you may see one without the other. Often, the problem comes and goes.

Causes include viral or bacterial infection, congenital defects (small or absent tear ducts), facial conformation (Persian features),  scarring from previous infections; and (rarely) allergies. But by far the most common cause of these symptoms in cats is infection with a Herpes virus. In cats, Herpes is an upper respiratory virus; it’s also called “rhinotracheitis” and is one of the components of the combination upper respiratory/panleukopenia (feline distemper) vaccine that most kittens receive. The vaccine does not actually prevent Herpes infection; its main function is to reduce the severity of the disease.

Nearly all cats are exposed to Herpesvirus as kittens. For most cats, no further problems occur. However, Herpes is a sneaky virus, and likes to lie dormant until it gets a chance to overwhelm the immune system. Because stress suppresses the immune system, cats under stress are particularly susceptible to recurrent Herpes flare-ups.

Herpes conjunctivitis is painful, and usually causes quite a bit of redness and a watery discharge. It often attacks only one eye, producing a lopsided squint. Cats tend to be photophobic; that is, they squint against bright light, or try to avoid it altogether.

There are several treatment options for Herpes. One of the simplest is l-lysine, an amino acid that is inexpensive and readily available at the health food store. It comes in capsules or tablets, usually 500 mg. Capsules are much easier to work with, if you can get them. The dose is 500 mg twice a day for 5 days (total 1,000 mg/day). Lysine has a slightly salty taste, and is easily disguised by mixing with canned cat food or baby food. If that seems like a huge dose for a cat, it is–but that’s what it takes to work. Once the acute episode is under control, a maintenance dose of 250 mg per day can be given indefinitely.

To relieve irritation and wash viral particles from the eye, you can make a homemade saline solution. Use 1/4 teaspoon of table salt to 1 cup of lukewarm water (slightly above room temperature). Three or four times a day, use a cotton ball to drizzle a small amount saline into the cat’s eyes. Make the saline fresh each and every time, because bacteria could grow in the solution between treatments. Or, try an herbal eye wash. Eyebright is an excellent for many eye problems; Halo Herbal Eye Wash is a two part rinse that includes eyebright, as well as infection-fighting goldenseal.

Homeopathy can also be helpful; try Newton Homeopathics Eye Irritation. Reducing stress with flower essences is also very beneficial.

Long-term nutritional support with immune boosting Omega-3 fatty acids and antioxidants will also help prevent recurrences.

If symptoms worsen, or persist more than a few days, a check by your veterinarian is warranted. Herpes can cause serious corneal ulcers that may result in loss of vision if untreated.

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New Freeze-Dried Meals & Treats from Only Natural Pet Store!

Only Natural Pet Store is excited to announce the addition of our new freeze-dried meals and treats! Freeze-Dried Fresh Filets and All Meat Bites are each made from free-range meats that were raised antibiotic and hormone-free. They’re grain-free too so they make a great option for pets with grain allergies.

Give your companion the benefits of a raw food diet without the mess or fuss with Only Natural Pet Freeze Dried Fresh Filets.

  • Freeze-dried patties
  • Made from free-range, antibiotic- and hormone-free meats
  • Same health benefits of a raw meat diet
  • Easy-to-serve portions in a resealable bag
  • NO grains, preservatives or fillers
  • Available in two flavors: Chicken with Organic Veggies and Beef

Treat your pet to the ultimate in pure, natural taste with Only Natural Pet Freeze Dried All Meat Bites.

  • Great as a training treat or crumbled food topper
  • No fillers or preservatives
  • From free-range meat sources
  • Grain-free & Gluten-free

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Why Go Organic?

Among the many pet food choices available today are a handful of products labeled “organic.” These products tend to be higher in price than most foods—are they worth it?

Definition. Because there’s a lot of confusion about it, let’s start with what “organic” really is. The term “organic” has a very specific, legal meaning set by the US Department of Agriculture’s National Organic Program:

Organic food is produced by farmers who emphasize the use of renewable resources and the conservation of soil and water to enhance environmental quality for future generations. Organic meat, poultry, eggs, and dairy products come from animals that are given no antibiotics or growth hormones. Organic food is produced without using most conventional pesticides; fertilizers made with synthetic ingredients or sewage sludge; bioengineering; or ionizing radiation. Before a product can be labeled “organic,” a Government-approved certifier inspects the farm where the food is grown to make sure the farmer is following all the rules necessary to meet USDA organic standards. Companies that handle or process organic food before it gets to your local supermarket or restaurant must be certified, too.

Products labeled “100% Organic” with the “USDA Organic” seal contain only organically produced ingredients. Products made from at least 95% organic ingredients may also carry the “USDA Organic” seal. Products that contain at least 70% organic ingredients may label those on the ingredient listing. The USDA has ruled that its organic standards do apply to pet food. Most organic pet food products fall into 70% organic category, but a few follow the higher standards.

It’s important to understand that natural and organic are not at all the same. Natural, as applied to pet food, means that the ingredients come from nature (animal, vegetable, mineral); in other words, they are not synthetic.  However, they may undergo many types of processing and still be considered natural.  Neither term implies anything about animal welfare; products from “factory” farming and confinement operations (such as battery cages for chickens), can still be organic, natural, both, or neither.

Organic Benefits.  Organic food has many benefits to the environment.  Unlike conventional agriculture’s chemical fertilizers and toxic pesticides, organic farming is safer for earth, air and water.  Organic farming is more labor-intensive, which accounts for its higher cost—but it uses less water and less energy, which are both in limited supply.

But is organic really better for our pets?  Yes!  Organically grown crops are higher in nutritional value and contain more vitamins and antioxidants than conventionally grown produce; organic meat and dairy products have a healthier balance of fats.  Pesticide residues are, of course, dramatically lower in organic diets.

Pesticides have many harmful effects; many are particularly toxic to the nervous system.  Acute overdoses are the most well-studied, but chronic exposure to pesticides over time has been linked to impaired cognitive function, decreased immune function, cancer, and even weight gain.  Young animals and smaller pets may be even more sensitive to chemical toxins, due to their faster metabolism.  Unfortunately, crops that have too much pesticide residue for human consumption can legally be used in pet foods.  Buying organic pet foods ensures that these contaminated crops don’t find their way into your pet’s food bowl.

Ready to try organic for your pet?  Here are some of our great organic products:

Dry Dog Food

Castor & Pollux (70% organic ingredients)

Karma (95% organic ingredients)

Natural Balance Organic Formulas (70% organic ingredients)

Newman’s Own Organics (70% organic ingredients)

Canned Dog Food

Castor & Pollux (95% organic ingredients)

Newman’s Own Organics (70% organic ingredients)

Evanger’s Organic (100% organic ingredients)

Raw Dog Food

Nature’s Variety Organic Chicken Diet (95% organic ingredients)

Raw Advantage for Dogs (100% organic ingredients)

Dry Cat Food

Castor & Pollux (95% organic ingredients)

Newman’s Own Organics (70% organic)

Canned Cat Food

Castor & Pollux (95% organic ingredients)

Newman’s Own (70% organic ingredients)

Raw Cat Food

Raw Advantage (100% organic ingredients)

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