Posts tagged raw diet

Great Advice : A good diet for Corgis, and all dogs!

The Customer Care team at Only Natural Pet Store is a great and helpful resource for our customers.

Researching and purchasing products online is awesome, but what’s even more awesome is when you get a little stuck and you can email or call a real, live, human who is passionate about your concerns.  Here is an example of a recent email exchange between an avid pet-owner and one our great customer care peeps. One of the many great reasons to consider Only Natural Pet Store for your pet care needs!

Question: Hi – I have 2 Corgis on Honest Kitchen “Preference” & ground beef.  They’re fed once a day & once a week given turkey necks in place of their meals.  Both are in great condition – one is used in herding competitions & both are always getting complemented by people saying “I thought Corgis were always fat & yours aren’t!”  Anyway, I just wanted to know if I’m doing what I should be, if I should have them working on more raw bones (don’t want to have slab fractures in teeth) or anything different….

Thanks for your time – A Happy ONPS Customer

Reply: What you’re doing sounds great!!  I also have a Corgi who has a waistline – how unusual!  It’s a simple concept – just feed a whole food diet and your dog will look and feel great, and this is true for every dog, not just Corgis.

As far as what you are feeding, I recommend rotating proteins on occasion, and even rotating to other dehydrated foods.

My favorite dehydrated food is Sojos Europa Grain-Free Dog Food Mix.  The 8 pound bag of Sojos lasts for six weeks at my house with one very large dog (110 lb White German Shepherd), and one small dog (22 lbs) eating it every day.  I feed a 50/50 proportion of Sojos/protein most of the time, and will include yogurt, eggs, cottage cheese, beans or lentils, mackerel, and sardines as the protein, as well as other kinds of meat.

My Corgi eats mostly chicken meat with raw bones/poultry necks 2-3 x per week.  Both my dogs eat eggs as their protein at least 4x per week (morning meals, mostly).  My big dog eats a completely raw diet with a beef blend as his main protein source.  I bring in, intermittently, things like Stella & Chewy’s Frozen Raw Food for Dogs (duck); ZiwiPeak Daily Dog Cuisine Dry Food (venison or lamb); or Complete Natural Nutrition Real Food Toppers (wild salmon).  So, for example, once a month I would buy one of these products and include it in the meals of my two dogs and cat for a week or so at a time, or until the food runs out.  Then we go back to their normal staple protein.

I also recommend the following supplements:

~ESSENTIAL FATTY ACIDS are essential!  For joint health, brain development, skin coat nourishment and EFA’s also carry toxins out of the body.  These are important to give every single day!
Ultra Oil Skin & Coat Supplement with Hempseed Oil

~GREENS are loaded with enzymes, and they make food they are added to more digestible and nutritious, and are very cleansing. Excellent for all dogs, and especially dogs that are healing or out of balance.

Dr. Harvey’s MultiVitamin, Mineral & Herbal Supplement (my personal favorite – fantastic ingredients!)

~DIGESTIVE ENZYMES make food much more bio-available and take the burden off the pancreas.  In the wild, canines would eat raw enzyme-rich foods, never having to dedicate their own enzymes for digestion. Since our canines eat cooked and processed food, it’s only fair to replenish these important elements every single day:

Animal Essentials Plant Enzymes & Probiotics –  or
Prozyme

I hope this is helpful.  Please let us know if you have further questions or concerns.

- Sarah in Customer Care

If you ever have a question or concern, absolutely give us a call or email!

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Seizures and Epilepsy in Pets

There are few things more frightening than witnessing your cat or dog having a full-blown seizure—falling down, paddling with its paws, maybe even barking or yowling. Seizures are the result of an abnormal burst of electrical signals from the brain. Possible causes include toxic substances, electrolyte imbalances or abnormalities, head trauma, or metabolic conditions such as diabetes or thyroid disease. The uncoordinated firing of neurons in the brain creates seizures (convulsions). These range from a few moments of mental “absence” where the animal seems not to be aware of its surroundings, to severe “grand mal” with unconsciousness, stiffened limbs or flailing movements, and uncontrolled urination and/or defecation.

Stages of Seizures

The typical seizure has four stages; not all of these may be noticeable in any particular animal:

1. The prodromal phase may precede the seizure by hours or days. It is characterized by changes in mood or behavior.

2. The aura is the start of a seizure. Signals include whining, trembling, salivation, clingy behavior, restlessness, hiding.

3. The “ictus” or actual seizure. Mild seizures may involve “fly-biting” (where the dog will snap its teeth in the air) or lack of awareness. At its worst, the animal will lose consciousness and fall, going into a periods of intense physical activity lasting a few minutes. Multiple separate seizures in a row are called “cluster” seizures. More than 3 seizures in a 24-hour period, or any seizure lasting more than 10 minutes (called “status epilepticus”), are life-threatening conditions; seek emergency veterinary care.

4. The post-ictal period follows the seizure. The animal will regain consciousness, and return to normal over a few minutes or hours; meantime they may appear disoriented, blind, and/and deaf, and eat or drink excessively.

Causes of Seizures

In younger animals, seizures are sometimes caused by abnormal blood supply to the liver (shunt). Infectious causes are also seen more commonly in young animals. Blood tests including titers for tick-borne diseases (for pets who go outside in tick-endemic areas) as well as other infectious causes are advised. Several infectious organisms can be carried in raw meat, so seizures in a young animal on a raw diet should be fully investigated for such diseases.

In cats, infectious causes include Feline Infectious Peritonitis (FIP), Cryptococcus (a common environmental fungus that is especially associated with pigeons), Toxoplasma (a protozoal parasite), feline leukemia, feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV or feline AIDS), meningitis or encephalitis).

In dogs, infectious causes include fungus (Cryptococcus, Asperigillus), parasitic (Toxoplasma, Neospora, Cuterebra), viral (canine distemper, rabies), and bacteria (Rickettsia, Ehrlichia, and other tick-borne diseases). Most often, no cause is found, and the diagnosis is “idiopathic epilepsy,” meaning “epilepsy due to unknown cause.”

In older animals (dogs over 5 years old; over age 10 for cats), tumors become a more common cause, but strokes also occur. A CT scan or MRI may be able to locate the mass; there may be a surgical solution, or radiation may be helpful.

Medical Treatment

In both dogs and cats, the most common treatment for seizures is phenobarbital tablets (given by mouth). It takes about 2 weeks to reach a blood level that will control seizures. At that point, the blood level of the drug should be checked. Phenobarbital can be harmful to the liver. Liver function and drug levels should be rechecked at least every 6 months. Cats are more resistant than dogs to the drug’s side effects, which include sedation and increased hunger and thirst. There are other medications that can be used in dogs; but few of them work well in cats.

Natural Treatments

Natural therapies for seizures in both dogs and cats include:

1. High-protein, very low-carb diet. Homemade meat-based foods, low-carb/grainless canned foods, and frozen raw diets are all good options for seizure patients. In humans, this type of diet is called “ketogenic” and it is quite successful, especially in children. Dogs and cats are built to eat just this type of diet. Carbohydrates, including treats, should be avoided. Note that some parasites of raw meat can cause neurologic problems; it may be best to cook all meat products before feeding.

2. Taurine. This amino acid is crucial for nerve and brain function. It is very safe and cannot be overdosed. Give approximately 125 mg per day per 50 pounds. Products containing a sufficient amount of taurine include:

Pet Naturals of Vermont Natural Cat Daily

Pet Naturals of Vermont Dog Daily Senior

Only Natural Pet Super Daily Canine Senior

3. B-vitamins. Vitamins B3 (niacin) and B6 (pyridoxine) seem to be the most important ones, but a general B-complex could be used. A balanced 50 mg B-complex (often called “B-50”) made for humans will contain enough of both for pets. Because B-vitamins are water soluble, they are generally safe.

4. Boswellia. This herb, usually used for joint pain, has provided good results in studies on some human brain tumors. Give 100-150 mg per day per 10 pounds.

Genesis Resources Canine Pain Plus Formula

Genesis Resources Feline Pain Plus Formula

Only Natural Pet Lubri-Ease

5. Omega-3 fatty acids. Anti-inflammatory Omega-3s are also vital to brain and nervous system function.

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Safety of Raw Meat Diets

Along with recalls of wet and dry pet foods earlier this year, two raw meat diets were also recalled. Wild Kitty recalled four flavors of its raw cat food (chicken, turkey, duck, and tuna), and Bravo! recently recalled three lots of chicken and turkey pet food. Routine testing found Salmonella in the Wild Kitty foods, and both Salmonella and Listeria in the Bravo! foods.

Let’s look at this issue in more detail. First, we should remember that the recalled raw foods are vastly outnumbered by the hundreds of canned and dry foods that sickened or killed tens of thousands of dogs and cats. How many animals got sick from the raw foods? Zero. On the other hand, the benefits of a raw meat diet are many. Skin, ear, digestive, allergic and immune-related diseases usually improve on a good quality, balanced raw diet. Weight issues will also improve, since a high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet is what dogs and cats should be eating—not heavily processed, high-carb kibble containing synthetic chemical ingredients that pack on the pounds. Obesity itself contributes to many serious and even painful diseases such as diabetes and arthritis.

But there are always two sides to any story, and raw food has its potential drawbacks as well as benefits. Bacterial contamination and lack of balance are the ones most frequently invoked by veterinarians to prevent pet guardians from trying a raw diet. Let’s talk about bacterial contamination first.

The bacteria Salmonella is the most commonly cited danger from feeding raw meat. However, even though this bacterium is a common contaminant of meat, eggs, and soil, it is not a significant threat to dogs and cats, due to the carnivore’s shorter gastrointestinal tract and faster transit time (compared to humans). Food and Drug Administration (FDA) warnings typically emphasize the risks to frail people like infants, the elderly, and immune-compromised people (e.g., those with autoimmune diseases such as Lupus, or those on immune-suppressing drugs like steroids or chemotherapy).

However, according to experts—including the FDA—Salmonella does not pose any real threat to healthy animals. In fact, it’s estimated that 30% of normal healthy dogs and 18% of healthy cats (virtually all of whom eat processed commercial pet food) are already carriers. One study showed that, even when 80% of meat samples were positive for Salmonella, 70% of dogs eating that meat tested negative, and none got sick. The vast majority of human cases are completely unrelated to dogs and cats. It is prudent, however, to avoid feeding pets non-organic raw ground beef, due to severe contamination problems in the meat packing industry.

Listeria is another common environmental bacteria. The vast majority of Listeria cases in people come from processed foods, like hot dogs, cold cuts, cheese, and raw vegetables. It is a fairly rare disease, since healthy people (and pets) are resistant and don’t usually become ill from this bug.

Common sense says that handling raw meat diets for pets is no different from buying raw meat at the grocery store to make hamburgers for your family. By always following safe meat-handling procedures with all raw animal products, you’ll virtually eliminate the risk of illness for your pet and your family.

Lack of balance is another concern cited by those who are against raw feeding. While it is not difficult to make your pet’s food at home, it does involve education and commitment. For instance, plain meat is not a balanced diet, and can cause serious health problems. There’s also something called “diet drift”—you might run out of a supplement and forget to buy more, and after a while, the diet really does go out of whack.

Even without making meals from scratch, there are easy ways to make sure your pet’s diet is always fresh and balanced!

1. Pre-made raw meat diets. Only Natural is proud to offer more than a dozen raw meat diets for dogs and cats! There are both frozen and dehydrated diets that are easy to use, and great for your pet. Nature’s Variety, Raw Advantage, Primal Pet Foods, and Northwest Naturals, and FarMore are the high-quality brands you can find here.

2. Complete supplements for raw meat. These products are easy to use; all you do is add fresh meat. There come fresh, freeze-dried and dehydrated; and with grains or without. Only Natural carries many excellent products from Sojourner’s Farm (“Sojo’s” to many), Honest Kitchen, and Dr. Harvey’s. They’ll save you time and effort, yet still allow you to control the quality of the most important ingredient, meat.  Wysong’s Call of The Wild supplement is also available for balancing raw meat diets.

Raw diets aren’t for every pet. Animals with Inflammatory Bowel Disease and those taking immune-suppressing drugs should not be fed raw meat until the system has time to heal. You can cook raw meat or even raw complete diets without losing essential nutrients. As your pet’s health improves, cook the meat less and less until your pet is ready to transition to raw.

Many raw recipes and diets are grain-free, but some dogs seem to do better with some grain. Cats typically do better without grains. Either choose a food that contains grain, or add a little cooked rice, couscous, or oatmeal. Food-allergic animals should avoid wheat and corn; animals with suspected gluten intolerance should avoid barley, rye, oats, and wheat. Experiment with alternative grains like amaranth, buckwheat, millet, spelt, quinoa and teff.

If you haven’t fed your pet raw meat or “people” food before (or it’s been a long time since you did), be sure to make all dietary changes slowly and cautiously. The whole digestive system has to restructure itself to digest the new food properly. To ease the transition, extra digestive enzymes and probiotics are helpful. Of course, these supplements are beneficial for all pets, no matter what they eat! Only Natural carries a wide variety of probiotics, enzymes, and combination products for you to choose from. To name just a few:

• Only Natural Pet Vital Digest, Prozyme, and Biozyme provide important enzymes to help your pet’s digestive system break down the food properly.

• Ark Naturals Gentle DigestNF Spectra Probiotic and Only Natural Pet Probiotic Blend supply friendly bacteria and nutrients to support proper absorption and elimination of toxins and bad bacteria.

• Pet Naturals Digestive Support for Cats and Dogs and Animal Essentials Plant Enzymes & Probiotics contain both enzymes and friendly bacteria.

Even if you don’t want to feed a raw diet full-time, adding a little fresh meat to your pet’s regular diet a few times a week, or feeding part raw and part regular commercial food, will go a long way toward better health for your pet.

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