Pet Gift Giving Guide 2017

Pet Gift Giving Guide
The season of giving is upon us! And if you’re like 95% of all pet parents, you are already making a list and checking it twice for Fido and Fluffy. And why not? Our four-legged family members like presents too! It is estimated we will spend more than $60 billion this year in pet gifts alone.

As a natural pet parent, quality gifts matter. To keep everyone happy and excited, here’s the Only Natural Pet gift giving guide:

Holiday Treats

It’s the season of indulgence for all of us, so give your cat or dog some holiday treats like pumpkin spice biscuits or gourmet snowflake truffles. They can work it off in the New Year.

Toys

What are the holidays without toys? Cozy plush toys, puzzle treat balls or catnip treats will keep your beloved cats and dogs entertained through Elf and It’s a Wonderful Life.

Pet Beds

After all that indulging and playing, it’s time for a nap. Give your dog or cat a luxurious place to lay their furry heads with a new snug and stylish pet bed.

Outdoor Gear

Baby, it’s cold outside! So keep your fur babies cozy and warm with insulated jackets, booties or stylish sweaters. Bonus: They’ll look great on the holiday card. Ruffwear outdoor gear is especially great for dogs in the winter time.

Collars & Leashes

Get (or give!) a new leash on life. Sure, it’s practical, but why not spruce up that old look with some added style and safety of a new collar or leash.

You have a lot of great options for pet gift-giving, but remember that spending quality time with YOU is the best gift you can give your dogs and cats. Have a healthy and happy holiday season from everyone at Only Natural Pet!

6 Tips to Get Your Dog Ready for Cold Weather

6 Tips for Winter
Maybe you look forward to it and maybe you dread it, but whatever your opinion on winter, one thing is true – it’s a time when our beloved pets need a little more care. That beautiful fur coat is not enough protection for the upcoming cold weather months. Before the mercury dips too low, make sure you and your four-legged friends are ready.

#1 Bootie Time.

In the warmer months, booties are great for protecting paws from rocks and debris. In the winter, it’s the ice, salt and antifreeze that can injure them. Both salt and ice can have sharp edges which can cause injury and salt pellets can burn a dog’s paw pads. During walks, your dog’s paws can also pick up deicers, antifreeze or other chemicals that could be toxic. Dog booties from Ruffwear and Pawz are great because they protect against all these elements plus they help your dog’s grip on the ice. If your dog refuses to wear booties, try a dog paw wax, like Musher’s, and make sure you wash and dry their paws thoroughly after being outside.

#2 Sweater weather.

Coats and jackets for dogs aren’t just a pet fashion statement. Dogs with short or shaved fur or smaller breeds of dogs need the extra protection from the biting cold. And when fur gets wet it loses much of its insulating ability. When shopping for a dog sweater or coat, make sure you get the correct fit. Also make sure it doesn’t affect your dog’s ability to see or move comfortably.

#3 Time for reflection.

During winter’s shorter days, you’ll probably be doing more dog walking in dark pre-dawn mornings and dark nights. Make sure you dog is easy to see with a reflective jacket, collar or use a reflective light.

#4 Ditch the itch.

During the winter months, the cold air outside and the warm, dry air inside leave our skin dry and flakey. It’s the same for our dogs. Consider using a humidifier to add moisture into the air which helps keep skin hydrated. And omega rich salmon oil is a must for keeping your dog’s skin & coat healthy. Regular brushing and grooming can also help with this issue, as it gets rid of dead hair and stimulates your dog’s skin to produce more oils. Be sure to use natural shampoos, herbal ointments or natural oil supplements to soothe skin, or a natural skin and itch remedy.

#5 A spill that can kill.

Sure, you probably use pet-friendly ice melts, but that doesn’t mean your dog won’t come across dangerous chemicals while out on walk so steer clear of spills. Like coolant, antifreeze is a lethal poison for dogs and cats. Be sure to thoroughly clean up any spills from your vehicle.

#6 Enjoy the great indoors.

The threat of frostbite to dogs is real, so don’t leave your dog outside for long periods of time. Even sunny winter days can be deceiving, as wind chill can make the actual temperature colder than it really is. When it’s cold or wet out, keep younger, older and sick pets indoors.

Remember, if it’s too cold for you, it’s probably too cold for your pet. Use common sense, and follow these guidelines, and you can keep your dogs safe and healthy through the winter months.

Five Steps to Fighting Pet Obesity

5 Steps to Fighting Pet ObesityYou’ve seen the headlines – as a population, we are getting fatter. Close to 40% of adults are obese and that number continues to grow. But you may not know that this same epidemic is effecting our pets. According to the Association for Pet Obesity Prevention, an estimated 52.7% of dogs and 57.9% of cats are overweight or obese. Now consider that more than 60% of the owners of overweight dogs don’t think their dogs are obese, and you can understand why this situation is not improving.

How did this happen? Most experts blame rising pet obesity on the shift in pet diets toward highly processed, grain and carb heavy foods, and less and less exercise (incidentally, some of the same factors that drive human obesity). No matter the cause, the results of pet obesity are clear – osteoarthritis, diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease, ligament injuries, kidney disease, cancer, and an overall decreased life expectancy of more than two years.

As pet owners who believe in natural nutrition, we are not immune to this issue. As a result, here is a five step plan for recognizing and tackling pet obesity.

  1. Look and feel – Real scientific measurements such as the body condition score (BCS) is a great diagnostic tool, but you can start by doing a quick assessment at home using your eyes and hands. Start by feeling your pet’s ribs. You should be able to feel each individual rib with a slight layer of fat over them. You should not need to work at finding those ribs. Then look at your dog or cat from above. You should see a waist behind the rib cage of a cat or dog in the healthy weight range.
  2. Talk to your vet – a trip to the vet will obviously give you a very clear picture of your pet’s ideal weight, but with blood and urine tests you can also rule out other factors that may be causing weight gain, including issues related to the thyroid, metabolism or hormonal problems.
  3. Tackle the nutrition issue – A highly processed, grain-based diet of carbohydrates fed to animals designed to thrive on a meat-based, fresh food diet is very likely to produce overweight pets. Talk to your vet about switching to a diet consisting of more meat and nutrient rich fruits and veggies, or consider dehydrated raw pet food which is high in protein, digestive enzymes, amino acids and essential fatty acids.
  4. Meal timing and portions – The next step is to look at how often and how much your pet eats. It’s a myth that pets can always self-regulate their diets, so no more free feeding. Also, you’ll want to limit the amount of treats and no more table scraps for Fido.
  5. Get moving – Taking your pet out for a short walk to do his or her “business” is not enough. Exercise needs vary based on a dog’s age, breed and size, but in general, dogs should be active between 30 minutes to 2 hours every day. It’s a great opportunity to engage with your pet, introduce some fun new fetch toys and get moving yourself.

Finally, be patient. If you go through these steps you should see results. But remember that healthy weight loss takes time. As long as your dog is continually losing weight – even very small amounts per week – you are on the right track.

Hot trend: The Humanization of Pets

As devoted pet parents, we are unapologetic about treating our pets like members of the family. And more and more, we are putting our money where our hearts are.

This year alone, the pet industry will take in $63 billion, according to the American Pet Product Association. And much of that growth has been on high-end products and services that go far beyond basic health, safety and nutrition. We are indulging our pets in a manner of very well-kept humans. Here are a few examples of new pet products and services that support the “humanization of pets” trend:

  • An on-demand app to book dog walking sessions.
  • Services that match owners with local hosts who are willing to board their dogs; like Airbnb for dogs.
  • A GPS-enabled tracking device to track your pet’s activity level. Pet owners monitor daily activity goals customized to your dog’s age, breed and weight.
  • The proliferation of designer pet apparel and accessories.
  • On-demand doggie glam squad service that offers at-home nail trimming, human quality dog shampoos, sprays & conditioners, teeth cleaning for dogs and spa services far beyond basic hygiene and health needs.
  • Gourmet, human-quality pet food with trendy people-pleasing ingredients like carrots, sweet potatoes and pumpkin.
  • Apps that connect nearby owners looking to set up “play dates.”

Social media is playing a big role in the humanization of pets. How better to show off your matching manicures and designer outfits? It is estimated that adult dog owners post a picture or talk about their dog on social media six times per week, and one in six pet owners have created a social media account (Facebook, Instagram, Snapchat, YouTube, etc.) specifically for their pet in 2016.

Certainly technology is driving this trend, but what other causes are contributing? Social scientists believe it’s a combination of factors: For starters, more Americans live alone — the percentage of single-person households is now at 28% — and millennials are waiting to get married and have children. Meanwhile, retired people are living longer, healthier lives. These multiple trends culminate in a sizeable percentage of people who have the money and time to ensure that their pet is a happy and healthy member or the household.

We suspect that natural pet food families are no different. So we’re asking — where do you fit on the “pets as humans” spectrum? What is the most outrageous thing you’ve ever done for your pet? Where do you draw the line in pet indulgence? We want to hear your stories! We’ll share them in an upcoming blog post.

Keep Pets Safe When You Deck the Halls!

Whatever you celebrate this season – Christmas, Hanukah, Kwanzaa – chances are your home is transformed with decorations. The lights, the ornaments, the garland – just know that all those shiny and new decorations look like toys to your pet. You don’t need to hold back on the festive trimmings, but pet safety is something to consider during the holidays. Here are some tips to keep your pets safe while you deck the halls.

  • Protecting Sparky from Sparks. Keep wires and cords out of paws reach. A wire can deliver a potentially lethal electrical shock and a punctured battery can cause burns to the mouth and esophagus.
  • O Christmas tree. Your cat will think Christmas came early as soon as your Christmas tree is up, so how do you keep them off the impossible-to-resist tree of their dreams? Consider an artificial tree, as cats tend to find them less appealing. Choose a corner location or put the tree in a room your cat rarely visits. Be sure to get a sturdy tree stand and anchor the tree securely so it doesn’t tip and fall, causing injury to your cat. Also, consider getting kitty an early Christmas gift – a new cat condo or scratcher so she will be less tempted.
  • I love my new water bowl. Do not add any chemicals, aspirin or sugar to the water for your tree, which may poison or cause upset stomachs in your pet. Also, keep the water fresh to avoid stagnation and the release of bacteria.
  • All that glitters. Pets love tinsel and shiny, light-catching decorations. They might also decide that they look delicious. Don’t spend Christmas Eve in your vet’s emergency room. Keep a close eye on Fido and make sure he has plenty of new and interesting chew toys. Avoid glass ornaments, and keep any homemade ornaments, particularly those made from salt-dough or other food-based materials, out of pets’ reach.
  • Like paws to a flame. Never leave a pet alone in an area with a lit candle; consider using flameless candles instead. Pets can easily burn themselves or cause a fire if they knock candles over. Use appropriate candle holders place on a stable surface.
  • Plant danger. Mistletoe, holly, poinsettias, balsam, pine and cedar are all holiday staples, but they can cause nausea, vomiting and diarrhea if ingested by your pet. Also, many varieties of lilies can cause kidney failure in cats if ingested. Consider using boughs of just-as-jolly artificial plants.

The bottom line – be aware of all the new, tempting decorations in your house and keep a sharp eye on your fur babies, and everyone if your house can enjoy a safe, festive holiday!

Obvious but Overlooked – Why Grooming Matters

by Jean Hofve, DVM

You know how good it feels when you get home from a camping trip or other grubby occupation, and how much you savor getting all clean again? Well, pets also appreciate being well-groomed.

And just like any parent, you want your “fur-kids” to look and feel their best. Since there are some grooming chores that–like any kid–your pet can’t take care of by himself, so of course you want to lend a hand.

While grooming “how-to” information is widely available, what seems to be missing is the “why-to.” Shifting the focus from simple grooming techniques to the real value of grooming your pet can help you get and stay motivated to give your pet’s grooming and hygiene needs the attention they deserve. Staying on top of those needs will help pets live happier, longer, healthier lives.

Dental Care

Dental disease is the most common problem seen by veterinarians; about 80% of dogs and cats have some degree of dental problems by the age of three. The infections that bacteria can cause in pets’ (and humans’) mouths are known to cause heart disease, kidney damage, and liver problems, and they can even make inflammatory problems like arthritis worse.

Many myths abound about cats’ and dogs’ need for dental care, and one of the most common is the idea that dry food keeps pets’ teeth clean. This isn’t true, and never was. Many pets, especially cats, swallow dry food whole. Even when they do chew it, the kibbles shatter, so contact between the kibble and the teeth occurs only at the tips of the teeth. This is certainly not enough to make a difference in the formation of tartar and plaque, which most commonly builds up along (and underneath) the gum line at the base of the teeth. This causes the gums to become inflamed (gingivitis). Left untreated, bacteria can erode the connection between bone and teeth, and cause serious decay.

Keeping your cat’s (or dog’s) teeth and gums healthy requires a commitment on your part. Special “tartar control” diets and treats are not enough. Bacteria are always present in the mouth, and within hours of a professional cleaning, they are already hard at work creating plaque, a sticky deposit on the teeth. In 24 hours, the plaque starts to harden into tartar (or more accurately, calculus). Daily tooth brushing and regular veterinary checkups are essential. But don’t use human toothpaste; get a toothbrush and paste designed for pets. Your vet can give you instructions on how to brush, along with tips for getting pets to accept the treatment.

There are also dental products have been developed to help combat plaque build-up in pets’ mouths. However, without daily brushing, your pet will probably need more dental care from your vet. To learn more about Dental health care, please click here.

Coat Care

Regular combing and brushing is a must for many breeds of dogs and cats. Brushing is fine for short-coated animals, but for the overly-furred, only a comb or sturdy metal-toothed slicker brush will get down to the skin and pull out the dead hair. It is especially important to be vigilant about grooming during the spring and fall shedding seasons.

Longhaired cats are more prone to hairballs, and often become matted, especially behind the ears and around the tummy and hind end. Longhaired dogs are also victims of matting. Mats start out as small tangles but can rapidly grow to monumental proportions; and as they do, they tighten up and pull on the skin. This is uncomfortable because it pulls when the animal moves, and can’t feel too good when they lay down. Even worse, mats can eventually tear the skin, causing an open wound that may become infected. In extreme cases, the wound will attract flies, which lay their eggs there, which hatch into maggots.

It’s not a good idea to try removing mats with scissors–it’s very easy to accidentally cut the skin. Serious mats should be removed with grooming clippers, a task best left to professionals like groomers or vet assistants. But preventing mats by regular inspection and combing is really the best way to go!

Shorter haired breeds also benefit from regular brushing (as does our furniture!), and it gives each pet parent the opportunity to keep a good eye on their cat’s or dog’s state of overall health. Many subtle health issues can be caught early by vigilant guardians who groom their pets regularly; such as fleas, ticks, and abnormal lumps or bumps on or under the skin. Good grooming tools will make the job easier!

Pads, Paws, and Claws

Dogs and cats need regular manicures–but don’t worry, it’s a much easier process than it is for us humans! You just have to take a look every week or so, and trim where needed.

Cats scratch objects to pull off the claws’ dead outer layers and keep the tips sharp. Regular nail-trimming will dull the claws and minimize potential damage to people and furniture. The easiest tools to use are human nail clippers or scissors-type pet trimmers. Cats’ claws are curved, and can actually grow in a circle and back into the paw pad, causing a painful abscess. So check your cats’ paws regularly.

It’s important to provide a suitable scratching surface, such as a horizontal cardboard scratcher or sturdy vertical scratching post. If you don’t, your cat will pick a surface for itself…such as an expensive rug or your favorite chair. Nearly all cats can easily be trained to use the object of your choice. For those who are more persistent in their unwanted behavior, one of the other many alternatives, such as Soft Claws Nail Caps, furniture protection like Sticky Paws, or pet repellent spray will do the trick.

Unfortunately, some people still take the lazy way out by declawing their cats. They don’t understand that “declawing” is actually amputation of 1/3 of the cats’ paws. To prevent nail regrowth, it is necessary to amputate each toe at the last joint because (unlike humans) the claw grows directly from the bone. Declawing is extremely painful, and is considered cruel in most civilized nations. Medical complications are common, and long-term chronic pain affects many cats. In addition, one in three guardians will discover too late that declawing causes even more serious behavior problems, such as aggression and biting, or failing to use the litter box. Common sense, and a little time and effort, will resolve scratching problems and avoid a needless and inhumane surgery.

For dogs, nail trimming is equally important. There’s a common myth that says that dogs naturally wear their claws down, so there’s nothing to worry about. This isn’t true. Even dogs that walk or hike regularly still need to have their toes attended to, because: • Keeping toenails trimmed can protect skin and furniture as it does for cats. • Long nails are apt to split or break, which can lead to infection. • There are many joints in the paws, and long nails puts stress on them, which can cause arthritis. • Long nails may cause the dog’s toes to splay, creating an abnormal and uncomfortable gait.

If you are willing to do the nail clipping yourself, you’ll need a toenail clipper and good instructions on how to clip without hurting your pet. Your vet’s staff should be able to show you how to do this. If you’re not comfortable with the procedure, let a professional take care of this important grooming need at least every 4 weeks.

Removing Potential Toxins

If your cat gets into something yucky, like oil, antifreeze, trash, tree sap, or paint, don’t let her groom it off herself; use a non-toxic pet wipe to prevent her from ingesting potentially dangerous chemicals.

Dogs, of course, can get into similar problems, and are also frequent victims of skunks and porcupines. If you’re in an area known for skunks, you might want to keep a special cleaner on hand, such as SeaYu De-Skunk Coat Cleaner & Odor Eliminator for Dogs.

Sometimes it’s impossible to avoid walking your dog on dirty wet streets or through road salt or other chemical de-icing products on sidewalks and other paved areas. In addition to using grooming wipes for dogs’ paws, using a good paw balm can protect them from ice and help reduce absorption of toxic residue when used before outdoor outings.

Ear Care

Dogs, and in particular the floppy eared breeds, need regular attention. Our pets’ ears provide a natural sanctuary for bacteria and yeast, which thrive in the warm, moist environment of our pets’ ear canals. Dogs that swim or are bathed regularly need a gentle antimicrobial ear wash used after the swim or bath. Regular ear cleaning with this type of product for dogs and cats can help reduce the buildup of wax, which when it accumulates, further enhances the likelihood that a yeast infection may develop.
Cats don’t typically have many ear problems, so always take red or itchy ears seriously. Ear mites are microscopic, but the debris they leave behind can often be seen; it looks something like coffee grounds. Ear mites are common in kittens, strays, and feral cats, so if you adopt or foster, keep resident felines separated until the newbie gets a clean bill of health. We have articles on ear and eye care on our website, so be sure to check out our links below and visit our Holistic Healthcare Library for more details.

One thing to remember: be careful when swabbing the ears. You can go too deep and rupture the ear drum. Have your vet or tech show you how to clean the ears safely and effectively.

Bath Time

Cats rarely need baths, but dogs more often do. If a bath is needed, never use human products on pets. There are important differences between our skin and that of our pets (different glands, to name just one) Many products that are safe for human skin can be quite irritating to our pets. Many quality natural bath products for pets like shampoos, conditioners, grooming sprays and wipes are available, so be sure you get one that’s just made for pets if you bathe or use clean-up products on your pet at home. Be sure to rinse thoroughly; any residue can be irritating. As well, chlorine and other processing chemicals in tap water may be drying, especially when pets are exposed more often than necessary. In general, cats don’t need bathing, and dogs don’t need it more than every 1-2 months. However, they may be bathed more frequently if fleas, certain skin conditions, or allergies are a problem. Your vet can advise you on products and timing.

Think About Using a Pro

Don’t overlook the benefits of a professional groomer. Some breeds have skin and coat requirements that are better handled by a qualified groomer. A groomer who sees your pet regularly may be the first to notice a cyst, lump, or other potential problem. Even though a groomer’s services cost more, the savings in time and stress may be well worth it!

If you’re looking for more great information on pet health care topics touched upon in this article, please use the links below to explore these topics in more detail through these articles from our Holistic Healthcare Library.
If you’re looking for more great information on pet health care topics touched upon in this article, please use the links below to explore these topics in more detail through these articles from our Holistic Healthcare Library.

See all Dental Care Articles like “Dental Care for Pets
See all Allergy Articles like “Alleviating Your Pet’s Itchy Skin
See all Urinary Issues Articles

Click links below to check out other articles that may be of interest:

Chronic Ear Infections
Ask the Vet: Fungal Infection on Paws
Treating Eye & Ear Disorders Holistically
Ask the Vet: Chronic Anal Gland Problems
When Is It Time to See the Vet?
Ask the Vet: Food Allergies & Diarrhea
Bath Anxiety in Dogs

Article Highlight : “The Natural Approach to Flea Control” [continued : Killing Fleas in the Home]

This week we have highlighted some of the great flea information from our Holistic Health Care Library, today we’ll share highlights from the article on how to protect your home and environment.

“The Natural Approach to Flea Control” [continued : Killing Fleas in the Home]

Stage 2 – The Household Environment

You cannot rid your companion of fleas by treating him or her alone, unless you are willing to resort to toxic pesticides. Most of the population lives and develops in your house and yard, not on your pet. Treating the environment is essential if you want to win this war.

Carpets, Flooring & Furniture
Vacuuming and washing the hard floors often – daily during the height of flea season – is the least toxic way to control fleas. This will remove most of the adults, and some eggs and larvae. Keep in mind the larvae don’t like light, so vacuum under furniture and around baseboards anywhere near your pet’s favorite places to hang out. Remember to either vacuum some Only Natural Pet All-in-One Flea Remedy or an herbal flea powder into the vacuum bag to kill any fleas in the bag, or remove the bag and discard it in a sealed plastic bag after use.

Some infestations, however, are just too much to be controlled by vacuuming alone, and not everyone has the time to clean all the floors daily. That’s when we recommend using one or more of the natural “powders” available for ridding your home of fleas. The least toxic substances available for this are diatomaceous earth and boric acid products. [Read more about treating your home for fleas]

Bedding

Don’t forget the sleeping quarters! Wash your pet’s bedding in hot, soapy water at least weekly. You can even add some essential oils or Bite This! To the water for extra flea-zapping power. Sprinkle a little Only Natural Pet All-in-One Flea Remedy onto DRY bedding and work it in to help kill the little pests while your companion sleeps.

Stage 3 – Securing the Perimeter (Your Yard)
Last, but certainly not least, treat the yard. This can include simple strategies like raking, using Only Natural Pet All-in-One Flea Remedy or the more interesting possibility of using Beneficial Nematodes. [Read More about protecting your yard from fleas]

The Pre-emptive Strike
One last point to make: don’t wait until you see fleas on your companion to treat your environment! If you live in an area with a predictable flea season, begin the treatment a month before it starts. If you live in the Southern US where flea season is every season, start now and plan to treat your home regularly. Using natural methods takes a bit more work than dropping a spot of pesticides on your cat’s or dog’s back, but in the long run your companion and your environment will be healthier for your efforts.

[Read the whole article]

Also, remember that all of our flea products are on sale through April 30th, 2010!

Day 1 – About Fleas
Day 2 – Killing Fleas on your pets
Day 3 – Controlling Fleas in your environment
Coming up later this month! – Top 10 Common Myths about Fleas

View our Flea Care Kits for dogs and cats.

Employee Pet Profile – Kelsey’s Bernese Mountain Dog, Brooklyn

For April our employee pet profile will look at the beautiful boy that comes to work in the products department with Kelsey!

Employee First Name: KelseyBrooklyn, the Bernese Mountain Dog
Pet’s Name: Brooklyn
Breed: Bernese Mountain Dog

Favorite Food: EasyRaw, Orijen Adult Grain-Free Food, ONP Freeze-Dried Patties

Favorite Treats: Newman’s Own PB Heart Biscuits, ONP All Meat Bites, Bully Sticks, Raw Bones, Dogswell Veggie Life Treats

Favorite Toy: KONG, West Paw Zogoflex Hurley, Doggles Pentapulls Eco-Friendly Toys

A day in the life of Brooklyn (Favorite Story):

Brooklyn is a one-year old Berner who spends his days in search for new friends!  He starts the morning out early with a stroll around the block in hopes to finding one of his many neighborhood friends, and then it’s off to breakfast where he enjoys a delicious meal of raw, freeze-dried turkey and veggies – EasyRaw! Then it’s into the car and off to camp – he even brings one of his favorite toys, his beloved Kong. At camp he’s set free to play all day with his buddies, lounge in the sun and annoy his camp counselors!

Brooklyn, The Bernese Mountain DogHis chauffeur (me) picks him up after work and we head home where he bribes me for a few of his favorite snacks, Newman’s Own Peanut Butter Hearts or Only Natural Pet All Meat Bites. A quick nap on his favorite Big Shrimpy Bed and its dinner time.  Dinner is a few rehydrated Only Natural Pet Freeze-Dried Patties with Orijen Adult Dry Food & Only Natural Pet Salmon Oil.  Then it’s off to dream-land so he can do it all again tomorrow!

The monthly dog and cat news round-up

News from around the web in the world of dogs and cats!

Ellen & Halo Pets to promote a stamp campaign for shelter pets.

Ellen DeGeneres is working with the U.S. Postal Service and Halo, Purely for Pets, her holistic pet care company, to promote a stamp campaign for shelter pets.

“This is a subject that I am extremely passionate about. By working together, we can find good homes for millions of adoptable, homeless and abandoned pets,” said DeGeneres.

Stamps Halo Pets & Ellen
New stamps being offered thanks to Ellen & Halo Pets

Comments : Which is your favorite?

EPA to Increase Restrictions on Spot-On Flea and Tick Products; Cautions consumers to use extra care

“The EPA is committed to better protecting the health and safety of pets and families in all communities across our nation,” said Steve Owens, assistant administrator of EPA’s Office of Prevention, Pesticides and Toxic Substances. “New restrictions will be placed on these products, and pet owners need to carefully read and follow all labeling before exposing your pet to a pesticide.”

From the ASPCA on this issue;
“The ASPCA supports the EPA’s focus on clear labeling to distinguish dog products from cat products,” says Dr. Steven Hansen, ASPCA veterinary toxicologist and Senior Vice President Animal Health Services. “This alone could save cats’ lives. Improving the precision of the amount applied will also increase the margin of safety for very small pets.”

Comments : We at Only Natural Pet Store believe there are better ways to handle fleas and ticks (as well as flies, mosquitoes and other pests) without using dangerous pesticides. See our Holistic Health Care Library articles on fleas for extensive information on these hardy insects.

Dogs can tell the difference between growls

Not all growls are alike to dogs, especially “My Bone” growls, according to a new study published in the journal Animal Behavior.

Comments :No surprise to dog lovers; we’ve always known our dogs had an extensive vocabulary. One thing though, the article makes reference to a “freshly cooked, meaty and juicy large calf bone in a bowl.” We would not suggest using cooked bones with your dogs, as they can splinter. Raw meaty bones are a great treat because they do not splinter and they are great for cleaning the teeth and providing extra nutrients, but they should not be cooked.

AT&T sees big cash in small gizmos like dog collars

A wireless dog collar set to hit the market this year is just one of a plethora of new devices the telephone company hopes will catch on with U.S. consumers.
The collar could send text messages or emails to the owner of a pet when it strays outside a certain area, or the device could allow continuous tracking of the pet.

Comments : What do you think? Are you ready to get text messages from your wayward pup?

Great Advice : A good diet for Corgis, and all dogs!

The Customer Care team at Only Natural Pet Store is a great and helpful resource for our customers.

Researching and purchasing products online is awesome, but what’s even more awesome is when you get a little stuck and you can email or call a real, live, human who is passionate about your concerns.  Here is an example of a recent email exchange between an avid pet-owner and one our great customer care peeps. One of the many great reasons to consider Only Natural Pet Store for your pet care needs!

Question: Hi – I have 2 Corgis on Honest Kitchen “Preference” & ground beef.  They’re fed once a day & once a week given turkey necks in place of their meals.  Both are in great condition – one is used in herding competitions & both are always getting complemented by people saying “I thought Corgis were always fat & yours aren’t!”  Anyway, I just wanted to know if I’m doing what I should be, if I should have them working on more raw bones (don’t want to have slab fractures in teeth) or anything different….

Thanks for your time – A Happy ONPS Customer

Reply: What you’re doing sounds great!!  I also have a Corgi who has a waistline – how unusual!  It’s a simple concept – just feed a whole food diet and your dog will look and feel great, and this is true for every dog, not just Corgis.

As far as what you are feeding, I recommend rotating proteins on occasion, and even rotating to other dehydrated foods.

My favorite dehydrated food is Sojos Europa Grain-Free Dog Food Mix.  The 8 pound bag of Sojos lasts for six weeks at my house with one very large dog (110 lb White German Shepherd), and one small dog (22 lbs) eating it every day.  I feed a 50/50 proportion of Sojos/protein most of the time, and will include yogurt, eggs, cottage cheese, beans or lentils, mackerel, and sardines as the protein, as well as other kinds of meat.

My Corgi eats mostly chicken meat with raw bones/poultry necks 2-3 x per week.  Both my dogs eat eggs as their protein at least 4x per week (morning meals, mostly).  My big dog eats a completely raw diet with a beef blend as his main protein source.  I bring in, intermittently, things like Stella & Chewy’s Frozen Raw Food for Dogs (duck); ZiwiPeak Daily Dog Cuisine Dry Food (venison or lamb); or Complete Natural Nutrition Real Food Toppers (wild salmon).  So, for example, once a month I would buy one of these products and include it in the meals of my two dogs and cat for a week or so at a time, or until the food runs out.  Then we go back to their normal staple protein.

I also recommend the following supplements:

~ESSENTIAL FATTY ACIDS are essential!  For joint health, brain development, skin coat nourishment and EFA’s also carry toxins out of the body.  These are important to give every single day!
Ultra Oil Skin & Coat Supplement with Hempseed Oil

~GREENS are loaded with enzymes, and they make food they are added to more digestible and nutritious, and are very cleansing. Excellent for all dogs, and especially dogs that are healing or out of balance.

Dr. Harvey’s MultiVitamin, Mineral & Herbal Supplement (my personal favorite – fantastic ingredients!)

~DIGESTIVE ENZYMES make food much more bio-available and take the burden off the pancreas.  In the wild, canines would eat raw enzyme-rich foods, never having to dedicate their own enzymes for digestion. Since our canines eat cooked and processed food, it’s only fair to replenish these important elements every single day:

Animal Essentials Plant Enzymes & Probiotics –  or
Prozyme

I hope this is helpful.  Please let us know if you have further questions or concerns.

– Sarah in Customer Care

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